Wasteland

DURABILITY SYSTEM

Because everything breaks

DURABILITY SYSTEM
The weapons and armor in Wasteland have survived the end of the world… some in better condition than others. To represent the damage items accrue over time, a durability system has been implemented. Weapons can jam and become broken over time, and armor can become torn and offer less protection. The tables below describe the effects of critical failures and critical hits on weapons and armor…

WEAPONS
Wasteland weapons are prone to jam and break. If a player rolls a natural 1 on an attack roll, their weapon suffers the effect appropriate to its type

  • Melee: The weapon cracks along its length. It moves one step down the durability track.
  • Ranged: The weapon jams. It requires a standard action to un-jam. The weapon also moves one step down the durability track.

As weapons lose durability, they become less and less effective. A skilled character can repair his weapons and armor with a successful Repair check. The durability track for weapons is explained below…

WEAPON DURABILITY TRACK

  • Working Condition: The weapon is in full working order. It suffers no penalties in combat.
  • Slightly Worn: The weapon has suffered a crack or jam. It’s still functional, but attack rolls and damage rolls with it suffer a –1 penalty.
  • Lightly Damaged: The weapon has seen its share of wear and tear. An attack roll of 1-5 with a Lightly Damaged weapon is considered a natural 1. It’s functional, but attack rolls and damage rolls with it suffer a –2 penalty.
  • Heavily Damaged: The weapon is on its last legs. An attack roll of 1-5 with a Heavily Damaged weapon is considered a natural 1. Attack and damage rolls with a Heavily Damaged weapon take a –5 penalty.
  • Destroyed: A destroyed weapon is useless. It’s suffered so much damage it can no longer be used in combat. A character can use a destroyed weapon as an improvised melee weapon, but a natural 1 on an attack roll sunders it to pieces and it cannot be repaired.

ARMOR
In Wasteland, danger lurks around every corner. To protect themselves, characters clad themselves in homemade armor. Unfortunately, the materials left over after the fall of civilization were less than ideal. As armor takes critical damage, plates are cracked, leather tears, and the protection granted becomes less and less effective. Whenever a character is subject to a critical hit, his armor moves one step down the durability track. The table below shows the durability track for armor…

ARMOR DURABILITY TRACK

  • Working Condition: The armor fits well and provides full protection. Its wearer suffers no penalties.
  • Slightly Worn: The armor has suffered a few tears and scratches. It takes a –1 penalty to its armor bonus.
  • Lightly Damaged: The armor sits awkwardly on its wearer, damage warping its form. It takes a –1 penalty to its armor bonus and its armor check penalty increases by 1.
  • Heavily Damaged: The armor has seen better days. Damage has twisted its form and exposed critical spots. It takes a –2 penalty to its armor bonus, its armor check penalty increases by 2, and a critical hit can be scored upon the wearer on a roll of 19-20.
  • Destroyed: The armor is nothing but scraps now. Destroyed armor offers no armor bonus, its armor check penalty increases by 5, and a critical hit can be scored on the wearer on a roll of 18-20. Destroyed armor that suffers a critical hit is sundered to pieces and cannot be repaired.

REPAIRING WEAPONS AND ARMOR
As weapons and armor take damage over time, they need to be repaired. A character trained (or untrained) in the Repair skill can attempt to fix his damaged equipment by making a Repair check. The DC for this check is determined by the item’s state of disrepair and its complexity. The items that survived the apocalypse vary greatly from a lowly bat or club to powered exoskeleton armor. This varying degree of complexity has a direct impact on how easy an item is to repair. Below is a table that shows the different levels of item complexity and the modifiers associated with them…

ITEM COMPLEXITY TABLE

  • Primitive: Primitive weapons and armor are the simplest to make and repair. A primitive item reduces its Repair DC by 5.
  • Simple: Simple weapons and armor are slightly more complicated than their primitive counterparts. A simple item grants no bonus or penalty to its Repair DC.
  • Complex: Complex weapons and armor have moving parts and/or particularly hard to come by materials. A complex item gains a +5 bonus to its Repair DC.
  • Advanced: Advanced weapons and armor contain parts or materials that were rare even before the apocalypse. An advanced item gains a +10 bonus to its Repair DC.
  • Highly Advanced: Highly Advanced weapons and armor are virtually impossible to repair. A highly advanced item gains a +15 bonus to its Repair DC. In addition, if a character fails his Repair check by 5 or more, the item moves an additional step down the durability track.

The degree of damage an item has taken also affects how difficult it is to repair. A Slightly Worn item has a Repair DC of 10. For each additional step down the durability track the item has gone, increase its Repair DC by 5. Repairing an item takes 1 hour. At the end of the hour, the character makes a Repair check. If the character succeeds, the item moves one step higher on the durability track. If he fails by 5 or more, the item moves down the durability track instead. A player can take 10 or 20 on this check, but doing so takes more time. Taking a 10 on a Repair check takes 4 hours, while taking a 20 requires a full 8 hours.

DESTROYED ITEMS
An item that has reached Destroyed on the durability track cannot be repaired by normal means. In order to repair a destroyed item, a character must take a full day to slowly reassemble the item. A character can take more than one day to try and repair a destroyed item. If he does, he gains a +5 bonus to his Repair check for each additional day spent working on it.

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